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BARNES CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL

&

BARNES VILLAGE
 

 

 

          

The initial bequest towards the building of a Convalescent Hospital near Cheadle, ten thousand pounds, was made in 1861 by Robert Barnes (1800-1871), He was a wealthy cotton manufacturer who owned spinning works in Miles Platting and Jackson Street, London Road. Robert had been the 8th Mayor of Manchester from 1851-53 and during that time Manchester became a city and the seat of a bishopric.  He made a further contribution of sixteen thousand pounds as an endowment to support the hospital.

BARNES CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL 

Gatley St James Archive 1886

ANCIENT CROSS

ST MARYS CHURCH CHEADLE

2012  Martin G Davey

Work commenced in 1871 using locally produced bricks. While digging for clay in the area several fragments of carved stone were found. These were considered to have belonged to three crosses. Unfortunately, the whereabouts of only one cross is known. This can be seen in St. Mary’s Parish Church in Cheadle.

           

Stockport Local Heritage Library

 

The building, completed in 1875, provided care in 151 beds and the opening ceremony was conducted by Sir Hugh Birley M P.

Stockport Local Heritage Library

The Vicar of the Parish of St James was Chaplain to the hospital from its opening which coincided with that of the Parish Hall. In the Church records can be found the following narrative:

‘On 18th February 1900, the Rev. Bruster (Vicar 1888-1928), after a heavy fall of snow, tried to reach the hospital via Cheadle in a hansom cab with a tandem and outrider, although lately laid up with influenza, but failed’

Stockport Local Heritage Library

Stockport Local Heritage Library

 From the opening in 1875 until it closed the hospital provided convalescent care for the patients of Manchester Royal Infirmary. During World War II as well as caring for injured servicemen there was a Fever Hospital for Yellow Fever and Tuberculosis cases with an Isolation Ward. Increasingly in its later years Stroke recovery and Geriatric care became a larger part of the mix. Indeed, in 1986 the author’s mother was a patient there while recovering from a stroke.

 

Martin G Davey     2012

Martin G Davey     2012
 

The Hospital finally closed in 1999 as the result of an NHS cost cutting exercise. In the same year it was granted Grade II Listed Building status. Unfortunately, this did not protect it from the ravages of neglect under a series of owners. The building had been put to a number of short-term uses in the ensuing years. Shortly after the closure a large group of Kosovan refugees were housed there and the site was briefly occupied by around 100 Traveller families in 2007.


Martin G Davey     2012

 As can be seen from the photographs, taken in 2012, it was not a welcoming sight. Saplings were growing from the clock tower and the estate was surrounded by barriers and patrolled by security guards.

 

 In 2015 planning permission was obtained and on 1st June 2016 the Barnes Village Show Home was opened.

 

Martin G Davey 2020

Josie Leibrick                   2020

The Barnes Village site of 25 acres comprises 39 apartments within the original building and a further 117 houses in the grounds. It lies within junctions 3/4 of the M60 and A34 to the north of the A34/A560 junction.

 

Aerial photograph 

 

Henley Homes Brochure 2016

Josie Leibrick                   2020

 

 

 

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